The Meaning of Xmas

Keeping the “X” in Xmas: it’s not some secular conspiracy!

We need to remember that the New Testament was written in Greek and NOT in English!!!

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“Xmas” is not some kind of conspiracy by atheist, gays, and minorities to remove “Christ” from Christmas!  Conservatives use Xmas in the nonexistent war against Christmas.  All this does is to separate ourselves from our neighbors that Jesus calls us to love.

The entire law is summed up
in a single command:
"Love your neighbor as yourself.”

Galatians 5:14

Read more: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/formerlyfundie/keeping-the-x-in-xmas/#ixzz3MGMa5tZH

 




Where did the confusion begin?

 Χριστος

Writing Christmas as Xmas is part of the historic Christian tradition.  Xmas dates back to the 12th  century!

Xmas is a common abbreviation of the word Christmas. It is sometimes pronounced /ˈɛksməs/Xmas and variants such as Xtemass, originated as handwriting abbreviations for the typical pronunciation /ˈkrɪsməs/. The "-mas" part is from the Latin-derived Old English word for Mass,[1] while the "X" comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός which comes into English as "Christ".[2]

There is a common misconception that the word Xmas stems from a secular attempt to remove the religious tradition from Christmas[3] by taking the "Christ" out of "Christmas", but its use dates back to the 16th century.

The word "Christ" and its compounds, including "Christmas", have been abbreviated in English for at least the past 1,000 years, long before the modern "Xmas" was commonly used.

"Christ" was often written as "Xρ" or "Xt"; there are references in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as far back as 1021. This X and P arose as the uppercase forms of the Greek letters χ (Ch) and ρ (R) used in ancient abbreviations for Χριστος (Greek for "Christ"),[2] and are still widely seen in many Eastern Orthodox icons depicting Jesus Christ. The labarum, an amalgamation of the two Greek letters rendered as ,[note 1] is a symbol often used to represent Christ in CatholicProtestant, and Orthodox Christian Churches.[19]

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and the OED Supplement have cited usages of "X-" or "Xp-" for "Christ-" as early as 1485. The terms "Xtian" and less commonly "Xpian" have also been used for "Christian". The OED further cites usage of "Xtianity" for "Christianity" from 1634.[2] According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, most of the evidence for these words comes from "educated Englishmen who knew their Greek".[11]

In ancient Christian art, χ and χρ are abbreviations for Christ's name.[20] In many manuscripts of the New Testament and icons, Χ is an abbreviation for Χριστος,[21] as is XC (the first and last letters in Greek, using the lunate sigma);[22]compare IC for Jesus in Greek.

 

Wikipedia Xmas  




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